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Sunday, October 12, 2014

SGI Gohonzon or Nichiren Gohonzon?


14 comments:

  1. You can see the appearances, feel the natures and essences, and experience the powers, influences, causes, effects, and recompenses of these two Gohonzons with your life.

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  2. SGI Gohonzon has a better layout. Nichiren's Gohonzon in the same layout would be more aesthetically pleasing

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  3. I didn't know you could read Chinese? How about this Nichiren Gohonzon, do you think the SGI Gohonzon has a superior format to it: http://markrogow.blogspot.com/2014/03/mounted-gohonzon-for-transmission-of.html ?

    Perfectly "formatting" the Gohonzon [if I understand what you mean by "formatting"] depends solely on the skill of the formatter and the quality of the scroll. One could even gold leaf the border were one so inclined. I think that would be the ultimate formatting for a Gohonzon.

    Now, if you mean the layout of the characters themselves, the Nichiren Gohonzon, which I compared to the SGI Gohonzon, is a ten world Expanded Style Gohonzon. The SGI Gohonzon is missing some representatives of the Ten Worlds, for example, Devedatta.

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    1. I was referring to the width of the background around the bottom and top of the Gohonzon, in retrospect I could of been more specific. I like the colour red, as it corresponds with fire, that symbolizes good fortune and joy in Chinese culture
      Briefly, the Japanese god of smallpox -- Hōsō Kami 疱瘡神 -- is intimately associated with the color red in Japan. The first record of smallpox in Japan appears in the Nikon Shoki (日本書紀, approx. 720 AD). But the disease reached Japan much earlier, around the time of Buddhism’s introduction (circa 550 AD). The disease was very dangerous. If the ill person’s skin turned purple, it was considered serious. But if the skin turned red, it was believed the patient would recover.

      DEMONS AND DISEASE. In Japan, the color red is associated closely with a few deities in Shinto and Buddhist traditions, and statues of these deities are often decked in red clothing or painted red. There are many clues that underpin the red association. The most compelling clues involve demon quelling and disease (e.g., smallpox, scarlet fever, tuberculosis, measles). According to Japanese folk belief, RED is the color for "expelling demons and illness.” The rituals of spirit quelling were regularly undertaken by the Yamato court during the Asuka Period (522 - 645 AD). Centered on the fire god (a red deity), these purification rites were designed to purify the land by sending evil spirits to the Ne no Kuni (details here). This association with evil segues easily into other links with child mortality, protection against evil forces (sickness), fertility, the caul (embryonic membrane covering the head at birth), and other child-birth imagery. The red bibs, red robes, red scarfs, and red caps found frequently on certain Japanese deities (discussed below) lend strong support to this interpretation.

      Briefly, the Japanese god of smallpox -- Hōsō Kami 疱瘡神 -- is intimately associated with the color red in Japan. The first record of smallpox in Japan appears in the Nikon Shoki (日本書紀, approx. 720 AD). But the disease reached Japan much earlier, around the time of Buddhism’s introduction (circa 550 AD). The disease was very dangerous. If the ill person’s skin turned purple, it was considered serious. But if the skin turned red, it was believed the patient would recover.

      This early association between demons of disease and the color red was gradually turned upside-down -- proper worship of the disease deity would bring life, but improper worship or neglect would result in death. In later centuries, the Japanese recommended that children with smallpox be clothed in red garments and that those caring for the sick also wear red (smallpox details here). The Red-Equals-Sickness symbolism quickly gave way to a new dualism between evil and good, between death and life, between hell and heaven, with red embodying both life-creating and life-sustaining powers. As a result, the color red was dedicated not only to deities of sickness and demon quelling, but also to deities of healing, fertility, and childbirth. Many countries outside Japan also have “red” traditions that are closely associated with sickness. See this outside site for details.

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  4. http://markrogow.blogspot.com/2014/03/mounted-gohonzon-for-transmission-of.html

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  5. i am sgi member and searchin for other nichiren buddhism members. i know sgi gohonzon is computer gohonzon but how can i get an original gohonzon?

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  6. practice with the same faith as Nichiren and study, study, study.

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  7. practice with the same faith as Nichiren and study, study, study.

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  8. I so and read very often in the gosho.but where do you get your gohonzon?

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  9. From others, online, Gohonzon stores. Tell me about your faith and practice Madame.

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  10. I practice nichiren buddhism like sgi.sorry for my English,i am more interest whats says the gosho,nichiren ans so.i still habe my problems with some facts in sgi,like daigohonzon....i still believe that there is one gohonzon for the World but i think of it as this original ans from this comes copies and so on.but i dont believe this daigohonzon is netter then my gohonzon at home or i must go to some place in the World ans chant to some special gohonzon.i so believe that wasen't nichirens wish.so i dont believe this also in sgi,germangohonzon in Bingen or kosenrufu gohonzon in Japan are not netter than my gohonzon at home.dont search gohonzon outside yourself says nichiren.so what do you believe.mark? Greatings michael

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  11. Since you practice not-Nichiren SGI pseudo-Buddhism, I think it would be incongruent for you to possess a copy of a Nichiren Gohonzon. Certainly, were you to acquire a copy of a Nichiren inscribed Gohonzon, you would no longer be welcome in the SGI [for the better].

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  12. Can You send me an private email: Madameslezak@yahoo.de

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  13. Tried to send you an email. "undeliverable". my email is illarraza@yahoo.com

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